Guide to superannuation threshold changes

Guide to superannuation threshold changes

Changes to superannuation thresholds from 1 July 2021 to 30 June 2022

Transfer Balance Cap

The transfer balance cap rules commenced on 1 July 2017. It is a limit on the amount of superannuation a member may use to commence a tax free pension in retirement phase. It is also the level at which you may not make any further non-concessional superannuation contributions. From 1 July 2021, this transfer balance cap will increase from $1.6 million to $1.7 million.

Non-Concessional Contribution Cap

The non-concessional superannuation contribution cap will also be indexed up from $100,000pa to $110,000pa and so the 3 year bring forward rules will enable you to make a $330,000 non-concessional contribution.

Concessional Contribution Cap

The concessional superannuation contribution cap will also be index up from $25,000pa to $27,500pa. Concessional contributions include employer SG (super guarantee), salary sacrifice or deductible super contributions.

Superannuation Guarantee (SG)

The contributions you will receive from your employer will rise to 10%pa from 1 July 2021. Employers will need to pay this on salaries of up to $58,920 per quarter.

The increase in contribution limits is always a noteworthy event, given it tends to only occur every 4-5 years. For those considering utilising the 3 year bring forward provisions, it may be worth considering deferring these payments for 6 weeks. This also applies to those who were considering using their superannuation to purchase a retirement income stream prior to 1 July 2021. If you would like to discuss these changes and how to best take advantage of them, please feel free to contact us. We will be more than happy to assist.

What you need to know from the 2021-22 Federal Budget

What you need to know from the 2021-22 Federal Budget

As Scott Morrison kept reminding us this morning, ‘we are fighting the pandemic’ and so the Federal Budget focuses on key spending to drive Australia’s economic recovery.

This is a Budget promoting economic growth and employment. While you will have those who continue to have major concerns over government debt and the continued spending, could it be that we are seeing a ‘new’ way of thinking when it comes to debt? My colleague, James Weir, wrote a paper explaining this with Modern Monetary Theory (“MMT”), suggesting maybe the focus on debt is unwarranted?

So here are the simply the main features of the 2021-2022 Budget;

Personal Income Tax

Low and middle income tax offset

This will be extended to 2021-2022 providing a reduction in tax of up to $1,080 to low and middle income earners.

Superannuation

Federal Budget - Superannuation

Removing the work test

This is actually a significant change. Individuals aged 67 to 74 years will be able to make non-concessional super contributions, or salary sacrifice super contributions without meeting the work test.

However, in order to make personal deductible contributions, you will still need to meet the work test.

Downsizer contributions

The charges announced in the Budget from that article include reducing the eligibility age for 65 to 60 years of age. This scheme allows a one-off contribution of $300,000 per person from the proceeds of the sale of their home.

To learn more about downsizer contributions and how it can work for you check out my blog here.

SMSF residency restrictions

From 1 July 2022, the Government will extend the central control test from 2 years to 5 years and remove the active member test.

Super guarantee threshold

The $450 per month minimum income threshold under which employers are not required to make a super contribution for employees will be removed 1 July 2022.

First Home Buyer Scheme (FHBS)

From 1 July 2022, the Government will increase the amount of voluntary contributions to $50,000 which may be released for the purchase of a first home.

Family Support

Family Home Guarantee

The Government has introduced the Family Home Guarantee to support single parents with dependants buying a home. This is regardless of whether they are a first home buyer or a previous owner-occupier. From 1 July 2021, 10,000 guarantees will be made available over four years to eligible single parents with a deposit of as little as 2%, subject to an individual’s ability to service a loan.

The Government is also providing a further 10,000 places under the New Home Guarantee in 2021/22. This is specifically for first home buyers seeking to build a new home or purchase a newly built home with a deposit of as little as 5%.

Increasing childcare subsidy (CCS)

To ease the cost of childcare and encourage a return to the workforce, from 1 July 2022 the Government proposes to provide a higher level of CCS to families with more than one child under age 6 in childcare. The level of subsidy will increase by an extra 30% to a maximum subsidy of 95% for the second and subsequent children. For example, currently a family may receive a 50% subsidy on childcare costs for each child if family income is between $174,390 and $253,680. Under the proposal, the family would receive a CCS of 50% of costs for their first child and 80% for their second and subsequent children. The annual CCS cap of $10,560 for families earning between $189,390 and $353,660 will also be removed.

Social Security

Pension Loan Scheme

The Government has announced added flexibility by allowing up to two lump sum advances in any 12 month period up to 50% of the annual pension.

The Government will also not claim back any more than the sale price of the house used to guarantee the payment.

Aged Care

The Government has announced a $17.7b investment in aged care reform over the next 5 years which will cover:

  • Additional Home Care Packages
  • Greater access to respite care services
  • A new funding model for residential aged care
  • A new Refundable Accommodation Deposit (RAD) support loan program.

Business Support

COVID Package

The Government will extend until 30 June 2023 the instant write-off of depreciable assets as well as the ability for qualifying companies to claim back tax paid in prior years from 2018-2019 where tax losses occur until the end of the 2022-2023 financial year.

2021 tax tips – How to avoid overpaying

2021 tax tips – How to avoid overpaying

I’m sure we can all agree that tax is something we would prefer to not pay; or at least not pay any more than we need to.

The ATO provides us with the ability to claim a tax deduction for personal expenses we incur in the quest to generate assessable income. It also incentivises through tax concessions, to reward certain practices such as funding for our retirement through superannuation.

So, rather than leaving it late, we have listed a few general tax tips for individuals which you may consider to either reduce your potential tax liabilities for the 2020/2021 financial year, or even to maximise your tax refund. But remember, you should always receive professional advice to determine which of these tips are appropriate for you.

Tax Tips 2021

Superannuation contributions

A ‘concessional’ contribution of $25,000pa may be made and a full tax deduction claimed for the 2020/2021 financial year. It’s important you don’t exceed this amount and remember your employer contributions are included in this limit. So, check-in again in June at what level your contributions sit at for the year, and if it makes sense it may be worthwhile adding while under the $25,000 limit.

And if you qualify under the ‘catch-up’ super provisions (detailed in our previous blog) your concessional contribution could be significantly higher.

General working deductions

Generally you can claim a deduction for work-related expenses (including educational costs). In order for the expense to qualify, you must not have been reimbursed by your employer and the expense must relate directly to your occupation and the earning of income. You must always keep your receipts.

The ATO has a list of occupation specific expenses which is helpful here.

Home office deductions

Many of us are continuing to spend more time working from home. If you are, you may be able to claim a deduction for expenses you incur relating to work.

For 2020/2021, the ATO will allow you to continue to use the ‘Short-cut’ method in determining your home office expenses. This basically involves maintaining a diary for 4 weeks noting the hours you work from home. An amount of $0.80 per hour may then be claimable.

The second method is the ‘Actual’ method, whereby you retain receipts and claim work related expenses (including depreciation on equipment), for which your employer has not reimbursed you. If you have a dedicated office, you may also claim utility expenses.

It’s actually worth considering both methods and to compare which is more appropriate for you.

Pre-payment of expenses and interest

Bringing forward deductible expenses is a great way to help manage your tax position.

If you have borrowings on an investment, such as property or shares, you may pre-pay the next 12 months worth of interest in June.

Capital gains tax deferral & the 12 month rule

If you are contemplating the sale of an asset, and expect to generate a capital gain, you may want to consider selling after 30th June to defer your tax liability.

Also, if you can hold on to an asset for 12 months before selling it, you will qualify for a capital gains discount of up to 50% (except for an asset held in the name of a company).

Offsetting capital gains with capital losses

If you have a capital gain for the year, one way to reduce it is to sell down any asset which may be trading at a loss. Just remember that any capital losses will reduce the gross capital gain (ie. The gain before any discount is applied).

It’s also worth noting that any capital loss which is not used may be offset against future capital gains.

Income protection insurance

Income Protection insurance protects up to 75% of your salary, if you can’t work due to injury or illness.

Not only is income protection imperative for many people, the premium is also tax deductible.

If you haven’t had you insurance needs reviewed, this may well be a trigger to get it done and possibly benefit from a tax deduction.

With the end of the financial year approaching, careful planning now may help to minimise any tax liability you may incur. So, don’t wait until it’s too late.

Review your personal situation now, and if you need clarification on what you can do to improve your situation, please get in touch.

Call Steward Wealth today on (03) 9975 7070.

How to pay off your mortgage sooner and accelerate building your wealth

How to pay off your mortgage sooner and accelerate building your wealth

For most people, their mortgage will be the largest debt they will have in their lifetime. Because there are no tax benefits on this type of debt, it’s worth considering paying it off (or at least partially down) quickly so can make the most of the opportunity to accumulate wealth outside the home.

So, here are a few tips which can help you get that mortgage down.

1. Get the right loan from the start

There are so many factors to consider when deciding which is the most appropriate loan. And the loan your friend has may not be the best loan for you. Just like the loan with the lowest advertised interest rate could cost you more in the long term.

2. Understand how to use your loan

Once you have gone to the effort of structuring your loan correctly, it’s important that you know how to get the most benefit out of it. For example, an ‘offset’ account may not help you pay your home loan quicker unless you have the discipline to use it as it should be used.

3. Increase your repayments – every dollar helps!

Whether it be a lump sum payment or increasing your monthly repayments, every extra dollar will result in a saving to your interest cost and thus will reduce the time to repay your mortgage. At a 2.5%pa interest rate, an additional $200 per month repayment on the average mortgage will save approx. $30,000 in interest costs. At a 4.5% interest rate, this increases to approximately $60,000 in interest costs

4. Work on your loan early

During the early years, a higher proportion of your loan repayments are going towards paying the interest expense, with a smaller portion reducing your principal owed. So, commiting to make larger additional/lump sum repayments during the initial years of your loan will repay a larger amount of the principal and so will save on the interest costs.

5. Ask your bank for a discount

You’ll be surprised with the reduction you may get on your interest rate if you just ask.

6. Better still use a pro-active mortgage broker

A great mortgage broker is invaluable. From recommending the best loan specifically for you, to explaining how to best utilize it to getting on the front foot and asking the financial institution for a discount. Our lending manager, Cameron Purdy was able to secure our client a further discount 18 months into her loan by simply getting on the front foot and negotiating with bank. It resulted in a saving of over $900 per month!

7. Build Wealth while accelerating your mortgage repayments

A ‘debt recycling’ strategy enables you to simultaneously pay off your home loan sooner, while building an investment portfolio.

So rather than wait until you pay off your loan before commencing the build up of your wealth/investments, you can start doing it now!

And while the investment portfolio is growing, the income it generates is directed towards the home loan acting as another source of repayments and accelerating the time taken to be mortgage free!

Debt recycling is an extremely effective strategy and while popular among many professionals, it is something all who have a mortgage should consider.

Forgot to make that super contribution? Don’t despair, you may ‘catch-up’

Forgot to make that super contribution? Don’t despair, you may ‘catch-up’

It’s not uncommon to meet prospective clients who either forgot to make a concessional super contribution the previous year, or didn’t feel it was necessary.

However, all is not lost, with a little understood strategy which, in some circumstances, allows you to make ‘catch-up’ contributions.

So what are ‘catch-up’ contributions?

The rules around catch-up, or more accurately known as ‘Carry-forward’ contributions, simply allow super fund members to use any of their unused concessional contributions cap (or limit) on a rolling basis for five years.

So, if you didn’t make the maximum concessional contributions ($25,000 in 2019/2020), you can carry forward the unused amount for up to 5 years. After 5 years, any unused concessional contributions will expire.

The first year these rules came into force and concessional contributions could be accrued from was the 2018/2019 financial year.

Why were they introduced?

The Federal Government introduced carried-forward contributions to help those who have had interrupted working lives to get more money into superannuation. Those who had time off work to have children, care for children or loved ones, or even those who previously didn’t have the financial capacity to contribute to superannuation all benefit from these rules.

Who is eligible to make carry-forward contributions?

Anyone who has a total superannuation balance under $500,000 as at 30th June in the previous financial year is eligible to make catch up contributions.

What are concessional contributions again?

Concessional contributions are those made from pre-tax dollars. It includes:

  • employer contributions of 9.5% pa of your salary
  • Salary sacrifice contributions.
  • Lump sum contributions to superannuation which you notify your superfund provided that you intend to claim a personal tax deduction.

There is an annual $25,000 limit for concessional contributions.

How does it work?

This can best be illustrated with an example.

Tina has a total superannuation balance of $300,000. After taking a couple of years leave, she returned to work in July 2019.

During the 2019/2020 financial year, Tina was eligible to carry forward her concessional contributions she didn’t make in 2018/2019, however, she chose to not make an additional contribution above her employer contributions of $10,000.

So, for the 2020/2021 year, Tina has a total of $65,000 of eligible concessional contributions. She has done particularly well from her holding in Afterpay shares and decides to sell them giving rise to a significant capital gains tax liability. Tina has a meeting with her adviser at Steward Wealth about how she may reduce this tax liability. Her adviser recommends making full use of the carry-forward provisions and advises her to make concessional contributions totaling $65,000 (including her employer contributions). Not only will she receive a tax deduction for the contribution, but she will also grow her superannuation balance.

Forgot to make that super contribution Dont despair you may catch-up

In summary

Carry-forward provisions are a real opportunity for those who haven’t been in a position to make contributions to superannuation, or who have simply forgotten to do so.

While it can assist in building up your retirement benefit, as you can see from our case study above, careful planning can also make it a very effective tax planning tool.

Superannuation can be very complex and advice really needs to be tailored to each individual. If you would like to discuss further, the Steward Wealth team are more than happy to assist you.

Want an assessment as to how this strategy could work to maximise your financial well-being?

Call Steward Wealth today on (03) 9975 7070.